Tag: Crosses

  • Lockhart Cross, Homewood Cemetery

    Lockhart cross

    A simplified Celtic cross with more than a whiff of Art Deco; it was probably put up in the 1930s, since the earliest Lockhart here died in 1936. The cemetery’s site attributes the monument to the Campell-Horigan company of Pittsburgh.

    Lockhart cross
    Reliefs
  • Stanley Zaksesks Cross, St. Anne Parish Cemetery

    Stanley Zaksesks cross

    Stanley Zaksesks died in 1920 when he was eleven or twelve years old. Perhaps his father worked in the construction business; this monument appears to have been cast in concrete. The name and date are painted.

  • J. Abate Cross, St. Anne Parish Cemetery

    J. Abate Cross

    A fairly large cross for a seventeen-year-old whose family perhaps could not afford a professional monument. Note the one attempt at decoration: a small sun pattern (or something) at the top.

  • Hipp and Gerold Cross, St. Anne Parish Cemetery

    Hipp and Gerold Cross

    A tall cross with fine carving and a bit of Art Deco flair for two rectors of St. Ann’s (note the spelling; the parish is now called St. Anne).

    Carving
    Inscription

    HIPP

    REV.
    CHARLES HIPP
    RECTOR OF ST. ANN’S
    CHURCH 1907–1918
    BORN OCT. 9, 1887
    ORDAINED
    MAY S6, 1899
    DIED NOV. 7, 1918

    GEROLD

    REV.
    JOSEPH V. GEROLD
    RECTOR OF ST. ANN’S
    CHURCH 1918–1929
    BORN AUG. 19, 1876
    ORDAINED
    JULY 4, 1901
    DIED SEPT. 21, 1929

  • Amrhein Crucifix, St. Peter’s Cemetery (Arlington)

    Two of these mass-produced iron crucifixes from the 1880s can be found in St. Peter’s Cemetery [Correction: After another walk through the cemetery, we have found at least four]. Their weakness as monuments is that the individualized letters fall off, though “Hier ruhet” is molded in the metal and perfectly legible. Fortunately there are other Amrheins buried in the same plot with legible stone monuments, so we can be confident that the letters AMR—I- represent AMRHEIN. The first name (-ACK-B) is probably Jackob. The birth and death dates are also illegible, though we can make out the decade of death as 188-.

    The epitaph is perfectly legible, because it is cut in a stone base:

    Ruhe sanft in deiner Gruft
    bis dich Jesus wieder ruft.

    Rest softly in your grave
    till Jesus calls you again.